Supplements

We get asked almost every day about what supplement brands are best and which are the best value. The answers to these questions are not easy. There are many factors involved in selecting which brand is right for you. The most important factor, of course, is efficacy. Other issues range from budget to having allergies to certain ingredients used in the manufacturing process that have nothing to do with the active ingredients in the supplement.

At Emerge we prefer to use professional supplement lines that may cost a bit more, but we use them because we can be assured of their quality and efficacy. Professional supplement lines are usually hypoallergenic, meaning they use inactive ingredients that are least likely to cause any type of allergic reaction. The high quality, professional line brands we use are tested and known to have in them what they are supposed to have in them. This assures that we, as practitioners, can be certain about their efficacy.

In 2015, the New York State attorney general’s office accused GNC, Walgreens, Target, and Walmart of selling “fraudulent and potentially dangerous” supplements. Included in the report are some disturbing details about the supplements these stores stock. GNC supplements contained ingredients that were not listed on their labels. Some of which are very dangerous allergens for certain people, including peanuts and soybeans. A ginseng supplement from Walgreens had only rice and garlic in it. Six supplements from Target tested negative for the main ingredient, they actually contained beans, rice, peas, and carrots. (1)

The supplements we prefer to use come from companies who perform a combination of in house testing and third party testing for quality assurance. They verify that the sources of their ingredients are of high quality and ethically manufactured. You can rest assured that the supplements we stock at are of the highest quality. At Emerge, We have done our homework so you don’t have to.

1. npr.org/2015/02/03/383578263/new-york-attorney-general-targets-mislabeled-herbal-supplements