Uncategorized

Why is butter back on the table?


Why is butter back on the table?

Why is butter back on the table?
by Sarah Larson, ND, LAc

Or: Butter never left my table but why am I no longer in trouble for having it there?

The old saying, “where there’s smoke there’s fire”, is a good adage. Things that have the ring of truth tend to stick around. Unfortunately, when it comes to high cholesterol, the presence of cholesterol in our diets has been wrongly accused. In fact, saturated fat consumption appears to have nearly no affect on serum (blood) cholesterol levels when people also eat a moderate amount of polyunsaturated fats, too. This is according to a review of research literature by Dr. Glen D. Lawrence of Long Island University in Brooklyn, NY. His article appeared in the journal Advances in Nutrition in May,  2013.

continue reading
Uncategorized

Supplements: Not all good, not all bad


Supplements: Not all good, not all bad

To Supplement or Not to Supplement, That is the Question
(OR: Dietary Supplements: More than 50 Shades of Grey)
by Sarah Larson, ND, LAc

Should people take dietary supplements? There is a lot of discussion about the health benefits and risks to supplementing one’s diet with additional vitamins and minerals. I’m not talking about taking medications, that is a much different conversation. When people take a multivitamin or other dietary supplement to augment their diets, it is possible to inadvertently take more than the necessary dosage.  Such over-consumption may cause further health problems.

continue reading
Uncategorized

Non-exercise physical activity may reduce heart disease risk


Non-exercise physical activity may reduce heart disease risk

Non-exercise physical activity improves heart health (Or: It pays to dust the living room while watching television)
By Sarah Larson, ND, LAc

While there is no substitute for a regular exercise routine, a recent study from Swedish researchers indicates just getting up and moving around throughout the day rather than sitting can reduce the chance of having a first cardiovascular incident and improved longevity. First published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, online October 28, 2013, a resident population of Stockholm County, Sweden, participated in a study for an average of 12.5 years. Nearly 4300 people participated and were grouped into two cohorts: those who had high levels of physical activity throughout the day and those with low daily physical activity. Regular exercise was not considered a factor in this study.

continue reading
Uncategorized

Hanging out my shingle


Hanging out my shingle

Hanging out my shingle
By Sarah Larson, ND, LAc

This is a curious profession. One goes to medical school for a minimum of six years in order to receive two graduate degrees only to be let loose to pursue a career as one chooses. I opted to spend two years as a resident physician to an exceptional Naturopathic doctor and Chinese medicine practitioner after graduation. It was my privilege to care for hundreds of patients in that time, each one sharing something of value. When the time came to say good-bye, I told each one that he or she was really my teacher. The humility that accompanies a patient’s trust in me as his or her doctor is undeniable. And motivating.

continue reading